Ariel by Sylvia Plath: A Level AQA A English Literature Worksheet Activity Pack

Set text for:
  • AQA A A Level

Activities include:

  • engaging questions
  • critical thinking
  • close reading
  • pair and group tasks
  • visual, audio and kinaesthetic tasks
  • further research tasks

Plus! Answers to all activities included.

Composed between the publication of her first collection, The Colossus, and her suicide in 1963, Sylvia Plath’s Ariel is both woeful and malicious, tender and insightful. Dig deep into every poem with engaging activities and ready-to-use worksheets. Plus! All poems are thematically grouped for comparison across the AQA A Modern Times suggested topics.

Prepare
  • Pre-reading exercises provide a starting point for study
Explore
  • Appealing poem-by-poem worksheets guide students through the entire collection, allowing them to gain understanding and analytical skills while remaining engaged
Practice
  • Post-reading activities explore connections across the collection, covering topics such as: • war and conflict • patriarchy • nature • gender and motherhood • death, transcendence and resistance • critical reception

What do teachers have to say about this resource? (8457)

'A useful resource... The questions and activities were clearly focused and knowledgeable, and the answers gave helpful responses that could be used by the busy teacher as a go-to initial response... A solid starting point for pupils in terms of an initial way in to poems and the collection as a whole.' J Hathaway, Head of English and Independent Reviewer

A really useful resource which isn't rivalled elsewhere on the market. Useful to both students and teachers alike. This matches [the specification] exactly. I really liked the fact that the writer has taken the trouble to offer points of comparison between this text and the novel texts too. This makes life much easier for the students and as a teacher it reassured me that I have been identifying the correct comparisons! I also like the way that it links the poems to the possible categories of identity thrown up by the AQA suggested topics." - K Chanter, Head of English and Independent Reviewer